Return to Keywords

Articles by Keyword for

ATP

This is out Library. Please click on the article title to view the details.

Antioxidants and Cancer Treatment

submitted by: admin on 05/13/2015
Cancer is a disease of lack of energy production. It is associated with loss of mitochondrial ATP production caused by oxidative stress. Antioxidants are the antidote to cancer development. This is why we sometimes see success with IV vitamin C treatment. Caveolin 1 is a marker that predicts survival. The question then is would it be worthwhile to treat with...

Can Light Therapy Help the Brain

submitted by: admin on 09/28/2018
According to a press release published in Eurekalert in April of 2015, researchers from the Boston VA hospital are studying the effects of infrared and red light on veterans with Gulf War Syndrome. They documented with MRI studies that LED therapy increased blood flow and ATP production in the mitochondria of brain cells. Previous studies published in the June...

Cherries Lower the Risk for Gout

submitted by: admin on 09/19/2013
  A study published in Arthritis and Rheumatism in September of 2012 showed that people with gout who ate cherries for two days had a 35% lower risk for developing acute gout compared to those not eating cherries. When consumed while on allopurinol the risk was lowered 75%. Cherry products lower uric acid, which is the end waste product of purine metabolism....

Coenzyme Q10 Improves Hypertension and Congestive Heart Failure

submitted by: admin on 09/19/2013
Recent data has documented once again that coenzyme Q10 improves hypertension and can prevent congestive heart failure. It can improve cardiac output by as much as 39% and significantly increases exercise capacity of patients with all levels of congestive heart failure. It has many other functions such as increasing HDL cholesterol, immunity, and arterial elasticity...

Congestive Heart Failure: Nutritional Support

submitted by: admin on 02/20/2015
  Congestive heart failure is the result of sufficient energy. Ankle swelling is an early sign of CHF. Acutely drugs are paramount and work very well. ATP production is dramatically low. A number of nutrients help our mitochondria produce energy better. Statins have the potential to lower coenzyme Q10 and create energy deficient states.                    

Does Sugar Feed a Cold?

submitted by: admin on 01/11/2014
Studies out of the University of North Carolina published in the December 2013 issue of Virology, showed that reducing glucose levels in cell cultures inhibited the influenza virus from infecting host cells and spreading to other cells. Now, if only we could lower blood glucose levels in living humans! While we cannot achieve this clinically, we learned...

Drug Treatment for Alzheimer's Disease is Lacking

submitted by: admin on 05/24/2016
Drugs developed to treat Alzheimer's disease produce only fleeting memory improvements and do not slow the overall course of the disease. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as Aricept, Razadyne, and Exelon and NMDA receptor inhibitors such as Namenda have very limited value. There is a new experimental drug called J147 that at least in mice enhances...

Exercise Helps Congestive Heart Failure

submitted by: admin on 02/19/2015
  Moderate exercise helps ease depression in patients with chronic congestive heart failure (CHF) and is also associated with a small reduction in death and hospitalizations. Even the failing heart can be strengthened by exercise as measured by peak oxygen consumption and longer duration of exercise that is done carefully under the supervision of a qualified...

General Anesthesia Can Cause Dementia

submitted by: admin on 09/22/2013
  An article in Annals of Neurology in February of 2012 showed that in mice the anesthetic Forane caused impaired cognitive function that were much like the changes in Alzheimer's disease. Previous studies have documented that patients undergoing general anesthesia may increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Transient cognitive dysfunction...

How Efficiently Does Your Body Use Oxygen

submitted by: admin on 10/29/2017
Oxygen utilization is different from how much oxygen we take in when we breathe. We can take in 100% oxygen and still not have normal oxygen utilization at the mitochondrial level if our mitochondria are not functioning properly. In an article published in the May 2014 issue of The Townsend Letter, Dr. Frank Shallenberger explains that if our oxygen utilization...

How to Prevent and Manage Statin Induced Myalgias

submitted by: admin on 10/02/2013
  Statin drugs to lower cholesterol are complicated to use, and for this reason are often misused. There are nine different drugs and there are major differences in their solubility in water or fat, effects on insulin resistance, where they are detoxified, and how much they interfere with coenzyme Q10 levels in the body. The synthesis of both cholesterol...

Infrared Light As Medicine with Maurice Bales

submitted by: admin on 10/16/2018
Infrared light therapy is perhaps the most impressive new scientific modality that spans many decades of medical breakthroughs. Its ability to improve or eliminate pain, often in minutes, is shocking. This treatment uses near infrared light to increase circulation, provide an increased supply of ATP (the energy to run the body), reduce inflammation, increase...

L-carnitine Improves Outcome After a Heart Attack

submitted by: admin on 02/18/2015
  A study in the April 2013 issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings documented that the amino acid L-carnitine significantly improves cardiac function after a heart attack. Apparently, l-carnitine is depleted after a heart attack and, if corrected, results in a 27% reduction in all-cause mortalitiy, 65% fewer dangerous ventricular arrhythmias, 40% reduction...

Mitochondria: The Achilles Heel of Cancer Cells

submitted by: admin on 06/24/2016
  Cancer cell mitochondria are the powerhouse and Achilles heel of tumor growth and metastasis. Cancer cells consume more than 5 times the energy than normal cells. This is contradictory to Otto Warberg's Nobel Prize winning thesis that cancer cells produced only limited amounts of ATP by burning glucose (glycolysis). Apparently, Warberg was measuring...

Never Fear Cancer Again

submitted by: admin on 10/22/2013
Cancer is a symptom of abnormal cellular function that is caused by nutritional deficiencies and toxicities rather than simple genetics. Actually, only 1-2% of cancers a strictly genetic and the rest are caused by epigenetics (lack of nutrients and excessive exposure to toxic environmental chemicals). There is a lot we can do to prevent cancer from developing...

One Session of the Relaxation Response Alters Gene Expression

submitted by: admin on 10/12/2013
  According to an article published in the May 2013 issue of PLoS ONE, a single session of the relaxation response produced immediate changes in gene expression of immunity, energy metabolism, and insulin secretion. Investigators from Harvard analyzed the expression of more than 22,000 genes and found that the relaxation response alleviates symptoms...

Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Diseases and the Failure of ATP Production

submitted by: admin on 05/28/2016
Parkinson's disease is not cured by any treatments we have today. Treatment is centered on blocking the symptoms of this chronic disease. There is a failure of energy production in vital areas of the brain that make dopamine. The energy producing part of the cell, the mitochondria, don't make enough energy to make dopamine and Parkinson's disease...

Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Generator (PEMF)

submitted by: admin on 03/31/2015
To download this PDF, click on the link below!

Tylenol Over Use Can Be Fatal

submitted by: admin on 10/17/2013
  Repeated doses of slightly too much Tylenol can be fatal. These patients had a higher fatality rate than single doses taken as a suicidal attempt. It take about 15 grams of a single dose to lead to liver failure and the possible need for a liver transplant. Taking just 3 times the recommended dosage can lead to liver failure and death in some people....

What is the Difference Between Brown and White Fat?

submitted by: admin on 10/17/2013
  There are many different ways to classify fat: saturated, trans, unsaturated, brown, white, and essential fatty acids. Some are essential for life and some are lethal. Where fat accumulates is also important. If white fat accumulates inside the abdominal cavity it predisposes to the metabolic syndrome and type two diabetes with all of its complications....