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Baby's Breath, Garlic Breath, and now Cancer Breath

submitted by: admin on 06/18/2016
  A study published in the October issue of the Journal of Thoracic Oncology showed that breath testing could be used to distinguish between lung nodules that were cancerous from those that were benign. Volatile organic compounds in the breath of people with lung cancer could be identified using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. This is a much...

Can Hyperbaric Oxygen Boost Brain Repair?

submitted by: admin on 09/19/2013
  Researchers from Tel Aviv University published an article in PLoS ONE in January of 2013 on how hyperbaric oxygen treatment can resuscitate the dormant neurons around a stroke. This area around the stroke, or peri-infarction area may regain function decades after the stroke. The researchers correlated the effects of this treatment with CT and SPECT...

Do You Need a Brain Scan if You Have Headaches

submitted by: admin on 04/03/2014
According to an article out of the Univerity of Michigan Medical Center that was published in March of 2014 in the journal, Internal Medicine, we spend about a billion dollars a year for unnecessary brain scans (MRIs and CT scans) on people who have headaches. Their research showed that the incidence of brain tumors, brain aneurysms, and AV malformations...

Epigenetics of Breast Cancer

submitted by: admin on 06/25/2016
  The Institute of Medicine (IOM) reviewed data about possible environmental risks for developing breast cancer. They felt that pesticides, beauty products, heousehold chemicals, and plastics might or might not be risk factors for breasts cancer. They did agree that medical x-rays were a clear risk for developing breast cancer. They recommended that...

False Positive CT Scans for Lung Cancer

submitted by: admin on 09/21/2013
CT scans pick up all kinds of lumps very well. The sensitivity is excellent but specificity is poor. This leads to unnecessary surgeries. Many small cancers may disappear on their own. Parallels to breast cancer are made.          

Five Screening Tests for Heart Disease You May Not Need

submitted by: admin on 04/12/2015
  There is no good evidence that if a person is symptom free that any of the common tests that screen for heart disease are helpful according to the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). Even for people who smoke or those with diabetes or obesity there's no good evidence that heart screening tests save lives or prevent disease. These tests...

How to Prevent Mass Murders

submitted by: admin on 10/02/2013
  Losing a child from a mass murder is incomprehensively horrendous. We are outraged every time there is a mass murder, but what do we do to prevent another? Not much. Gun control is understandably a complicated issue because we certainly don't want to have a dangerously deranged person who is capable of a mass murder to have a gun. Yet the second...

Is Automatic Writing for Real?

submitted by: admin on 10/09/2013
  Psychography, or automatic writing, is when the spirits of dead people write through the hand of a medium. Studies on experienced and newbee psychography practitioners using SPECT scans showed that there was less brain activity in the experienced vs those less experienced in the frontal lobes, which is where we problem solve. Clearly, there is different...

Is Breast Tomosynthesis Superior to Digital Mammograms

submitted by: admin on 12/09/2013
According to a paper presented at the December 2013 annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, breast tomosynthesis (a limited CT scan of the breast) is a better test than the digital mammogram because it is a more sensitive test that finds breast cancers (22% more), is it associated with a lower recall rate because of false positive tests (15%fewer),...

MDs Over-Prescribe Tests They Profit From

submitted by: admin on 10/11/2013
  Financial reimbursement and ownership of medical testing equipment leads to over-prescribing of these tests. These types of conflict of interest extend to ownership of MRI and CT facilities, surgicenters, cardiac imaging equipment, laboratory services and much more. A recent article in JAMA documented that MDs over prescribe two types of cardiac stress...

Meditation Increases Brain Power

submitted by: admin on 11/15/2014
UCLA medical researchers published an article in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience in March of 2012 showing that long term (20 or more years) meditators have more gyrification (thicker brains) than non-meditators. Meditators also have stronger connections between brain cells. Meditation is catching on in the US and now about 10% meditate.        

Neurologists Caution Against ADHD Drugs

submitted by: admin on 05/24/2016
  The American Academy of Neurology published an article in the March 2013 issue of Neurology a statement advising against the use of neuroenhancing drugs to boost academic achievement is school tests in normal kids. They say the drugs have not been adequately studied in normal kids; it makes you wonder if these drugs are a good idea for kids with these...

Radiographic Iodinated Contrast Media Causes Thyroid Dysfunction

submitted by: admin on 10/14/2013
According to an article published in the January 2012 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, exposure to iodinated contrast media during imaging procedures is associated the changes in thyroid function, especially hyperthyroidism. Reactions to the dyes are increased in people with asthma, heart disease, kidney disease, and in those taking NSAIDs, beta blockers,...

Selling Cancer Screening

submitted by: admin on 06/18/2016
  Medical professional groups and cancer advocacy groups need to refocus on educating rather than persuading about cancer testing. The harms of screening have been largely dismissed. It is easy to sell screening, just magnify the benefit, minimize the cost, and hide the data about their value. These tests are big business and there are conflicts...

The High Cost of Defensive Medicine

submitted by: admin on 10/17/2013
  You can't really blame MDs for practicing defensively when they are trying to do the best job they possibly can for their patients and they don't want to be involved in a malpractice case if they make an error. In a study of 1200 orthopedic surgeons 96% admitted practicing defensively. This came to an estimated $2 billion cost annually. Many...

Why ADHD and ADD are Becoming a Pandemic

submitted by: admin on 05/24/2016
According to a November 2014 article published in Social Science and Medicine, the diagnosis of ADHD and ADD are spreading like an infectious disease. Until the past decade, the US consumed 90% of the drugs used to treat these disorders, and the UK, Germany, France, Italy, and Brazil the rest. Even though far more of these drugs are now used in the US, we...

X-Rays, Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation

submitted by: admin on 10/12/2013
  The relationship between high dose radiation is well known, but much is known about diagnostic medical radiation in causing cancer. We now know that medical radiation plays a role in causing cancer, especially in children. We tend to over-depend on technology to solve clinical questions because it is easy and useful, and to protect liability of medical...