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Americans are Sicker and Die Sooner than all Other Industrialized Countries

submitted by: admin on 05/12/2015
  Overall, Americans die sooner and have higher rates of disease and injury from birth to age 75 than all other industrialized countries! Included are infant mortality, birth weight, injuries and homicides, teen pregnancies, sexually transmitted diseases, HIV/AIDS, drug deaths, obesity and diabetes, chronic lung disease and generalized disability. Over...

Anger and Heart Disease

submitted by: admin on 02/19/2015
Anger affects heart rate variability in a way that increases sympathetic tone and the risk from lethal rhythm disturbances. Type D personality has been described that reflects anger. De-stressing can reverse this situation. Challenging situations challenge our faith in universal power and offer the opportunity of learning lessons of life that aren't easy....

Assessing Arteriosclerosis

submitted by: admin on 09/18/2013
Risk factors for heart disease should be assessed depending on each person's family history and lifestyle. The tests used also vary with each individual's particular situation. This disease is generally preventable.      

Can You Workout Everyday and Still Suffer From a Sedentary Lifestyle?

submitted by: admin on 02/10/2014
Researchers from Cornell University published an article in the January 2014 issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine showing that prolonged sitting increases the risk for all cause mortality even if you exercise daily! They studied 93,000 postmenopausal women and found that those who were sedentary for 11 or more hours a day as compared to those...

Can Your Anti-depressant Cause a Heart Attack

submitted by: admin on 06/03/2015
Researchers from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center published an article in the May issue of Psychosomatic Medicine showing a six fold increase in atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries of primates when they were taking Zoloft, and SSRI antidepressant. The monkeys were fed an atherogenic diet for 18 months. They were then randomized and half were...

Cholesterol Confusion with Len Saputo, MD

submitted by: admin on 08/14/2017
  Cholesterol is related to but not the direct cause of arteriosclerosis, heart disease, or strokes. We cannot live without cholesterol; we must have it to make cell membranes, vitamin D, many hormones, many neurotransmitters, and bile salts. Yet it is related to heart disease. In general, the higher the cholesterol the worse the risk for heart disease....

Do Mammograms Do More Harm Than Good?

submitted by: admin on 01/20/2019
Mammograms under age 50 are controversial. The prestigious Cochrane Study Group concluded that they lead to overdiagnosis and overtreatment. Mammograms use x-rays to differentiate tissue density that is normal or cancerous; this is very difficult in women under age 50 because they have dense breast tissue that is similar to that of breast cancers. It takes almost...

Do Vegetarians Really have a Lower Risk for Heart Disease?

submitted by: admin on 09/20/2013
  The January issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition posted an article claiming that vegetarians had 32% less heart disease than those eating meat and fish. The type of meat eaten was not disclosed. There are major differences between feed lot beef and grass fed beef or wild game that went unaddressed. Of course it is misleading and...

Encourage Exercise for People with Heart Disease

submitted by: admin on 01/20/2019
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Exercise Reduces the Effect of an Obesity Gene

submitted by: admin on 09/21/2013
  Physical exercise can change the DNA in certain genes that stimulate obesity and lessen their effects by about 30%. Epigenetics has a lot to do with how the DNA in our genes manifests itself. This challenges the widely held belief that what is in our DNA is not changeable...thank goodness that this is not true. We have found the same epigenetic...

Free Your Breath and Free Your Life with Dennis Lewis

submitted by: admin on 09/21/2013
The breath is the force of life energy in many traditions and it reflects much about who we are and how we are. If we notice how we breathe, we can take action to consciously shift it in ways that can help us relax. Abdominal and chest breathing is reviewed and correlated with sympathetic and parasympathetic stimulation.        

Genes and Heart Attack

submitted by: admin on 01/20/2019
Scientists have found thirteen new gene variants that can increase a person's chance of developing heart disease.  One of the benefits would be the ability to identify people carrying this gene and neutralize the excess risk.  According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cardio vascular disease, one of the largest killers in the...

High Calcium Intake Doubles Risk for Heart Disease

submitted by: admin on 09/24/2013
  Calcium intake above 1400 mg per day is associated with doubling the risk of dying from a heart attack in both men and women. There are many studies showing that in women with osteoporosis who take large doses of calcium are at risk for both heart attacks and stroke. Although it may be logical to try and replace the lost calcium in bone in osteoporosis...

Introduction for Managing Heart Disease

submitted by: admin on 01/20/2019
  Arteriosclerotic heart disease is defined by reduced blood flow caused by cholesterol plaques, with or without blood clots, in one or more blood vessels of the heart. This situation can lead to insufficient nutrient delivery to the downstream tissues that can cause these very important complications.     Congestive heart failure...

Is Sex Necessary?

submitted by: admin on 10/09/2013
A good sex life helps with sense of smell, boosts immunity, and reduces cancer, heart disease, and stroke, and also improves pain and depression. Oxytocin, testosterone, prostaglandins are involved.          

Isometric Exercises For the Heart with Pax Beale

submitted by: admin on 01/20/2019
  Pax tells the story of his having angina, a heart attack, his survival, and the importance of exercise.

Job Burnout Predisposes to Heart Disease

submitted by: admin on 10/09/2013
  Accprdomg to a study in Psychosomatic Medicine in March of 2013, Americans work longer hours, take fewer vacation days, and retire later than employees compared to other countries. This leads to job burnout, and it is related to premature coronary artery disease and heart attacks. The top 20% of the burnout scale had a 79% increase risk of coronary...

Lack of Sleep and Risk for Aggressive Breast Cancer

submitted by: admin on 06/30/2016
  Getting less than 6 hours a night of sleep is a risk factor in postmenopausal women with stage 1 or 2, estrogen positive, node negative breast cancer using the Oncotype DX tumor test. It measures the risk of tumor recurrence based on the expression of 21 oncogenes. Lack of sleep causes inflammation in the body that increases the risk for obesity,...

Load Up on Fiber Now and Avoid Heart Disease Later

submitted by: admin on 01/20/2019
Most of the time we associate fiber with bowel health, especially constipation. However, fiber has a prominent role in lowering hypertension, weight, and cholesterol and has been shown to lower the risk of heart disease later in life. We need between 25 and 40 grams a day of fiber and this can easily be achieved by filling two thirds of your plate with fruit,...

Low HDL Cholesterol Does Not Cause Heart Attacks

submitted by: admin on 02/19/2015
  Even though there is abundant evidence that people with low protective HDL cholesterol are at risk for heart attacks, a large new study refutes this myth. People with high HDL in this study of 70,000 people had a much lower incidence of heart attacks, but people with a genetic defect in producing HDL and had a low level in this study did not have an...