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Aneuploidy and Cancer with David Rasnick Part 1

submitted by: admin on 05/12/2015
  Theories about the cause of cancer are many but the answers are not clear. Aneuploidy is an imbalance of the number of chromosomes, In cancer they usually range between 60-90 chromosomes rather than 46. No two cancers are the same. Normal cells do not de-differentiate, they progress in an abnormal way. Gene mutations are too small to cause cancer.                

Aneuploidy and Cancer with David Rasnick Part 2

submitted by: admin on 05/12/2015
  It is the number of chromosomes, not genes, that lead to the massive changes required for cancer. There are no confirmed cases of normal diploid cancer. Cancer cells are damaged cells that are trying to survive and as a consequence they cause disease. Gene theories do not explain the progression of cancer.                

BRACA Gene Mutation Cancer Risks

submitted by: admin on 09/19/2013
BRACA gene mutations are associated with a number of cancers such as breast, ovarian, and prostate. Women with this defect have about an 80% chance of getting cancer in their lifetime. Treatment options are reviewed.          

Does Spiritual Health Lead to Better Health?

submitted by: admin on 06/01/2014
  Despite differences in rituals and belief among the world's major religions (Buddhism, Muslims, Jews, Catholics, Protestants), spirituality often enhances health regardless of a person's faith according to researchers at the University of Missouri. Actually, anything you believe, whether in self, others, or spirit, has a powerful effect...

Does Your Attitude Affect Your Genes?

submitted by: admin on 02/19/2015
  The July issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences posted an article by UCLA and the University of North Carolina showing that different types of happiness have surprisingly different effects on the human genome. Narcissistic happiness, like prolonged stress, causes high levels of inflammation and low antiviral and antibody...

Epigenetics with Bruce Lipton

submitted by: admin on 03/01/2024
Genes in cells are influenced and controlled by the environment in which it lives. This means that DNA is not immutable. Our perception of how we see the world influences our genetic makeup. We are actually the masters of our biology because what we think affects how our genes effect our biology. Even identical twins have different gene readouts that become more...

Exercise Reduces the Effect of an Obesity Gene

submitted by: admin on 09/21/2013
  Physical exercise can change the DNA in certain genes that stimulate obesity and lessen their effects by about 30%. Epigenetics has a lot to do with how the DNA in our genes manifests itself. This challenges the widely held belief that what is in our DNA is not changeable...thank goodness that this is not true. We have found the same epigenetic...

Father's Obesity Affects Sperm DNA for Two Generations

submitted by: admin on 09/21/2013
  An article published in FASEB Journal showed that obesity in fathers changed the DNA in their sperm so as to put future generations at risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes even if they consumed a healthy diet. This change developed whether or not the obese father had signs of type 2 diabetes or the metabolic syndrome. We've long known that...

Flawed Genes Account for less than One Percent of All Diseases

submitted by: admin on 02/19/2015
  According to editorials in August of 2012 from Sayer Ji of GreenMedInfo, and Elizabeth Renter of NaturalSociety, it has been estimated that less than 1% of all diseases are caused by flawed genes! Because the influence of our environment on genes (epigenetics) usually determines the expression of our genes, our lifestyle becomes very important...

Genes and Heart Attack

submitted by: admin on 03/01/2024
Scientists have found thirteen new gene variants that can increase a person's chance of developing heart disease.  One of the benefits would be the ability to identify people carrying this gene and neutralize the excess risk.  According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cardio vascular disease, one of the largest killers in the...

Is Getting Cancer Just Bad Luck?

submitted by: admin on 01/22/2015
Reseachers from John Hopkins Cancer created a statistical model measuring the proportion of cancer incidence caused by random mutations during stem cell division; this was published in the journal, Science in January of 2015. They concluded that 2/3 of cancers can be explained by "bad luck." What they really determined was an association rather than...

Is it DNA or Lifestyle that Regulates our Genes?

submitted by: admin on 10/09/2013
  The December issue of the journal Aging Cell reported that molecular changes causing cancer are related to our genes and are driven mainly by aging, but are also dictated by what we eat, how much we weigh, and levels of vitamin D, selenium, and folic acid. This study out of Newcastle University in the UK showed that aging had the biggest effect on...

Is melatonin effective cancer treatment?

submitted by: admin on 06/24/2016
  Melatonin has a wide range of benefits in people with cancer. It is an immune booster (increases NK cells that fight cancer), inhibits angiogenesis, increases apoptosis, alleviates many of the side effects of chemotherapy and radiation thereapy, and is safe, affordable, and available. Research from Cancer Treatment Centers of America shows that...

Is Mistletoe an Effective Cancer Treatment?

submitted by: admin on 06/24/2016
  A century ago Rudolph Steiner developed anthroposophical medicine. It is based on intuitive thinking about associations the 4 aspects of the human body--physical, etheric, astral, and ego--and plants, minerals, and the cosmos. Steiner's intuition was based on the fact that mistletoe is a parasitic growth that eventually kills its host. Inspired...

Lifestyle Modifies Your DNA

submitted by: admin on 02/19/2015
The field of epigenetics is exploding. We now know that DNA changes in response to environmental exposures and causes major changes in gene expressivity. It is well known that prostate cancer genes (oncogenes) are turned on and off by diet, exercise, relation, sleep, meditation and more. The work of Dean Ornish, MD on prostate cancer proved this. We now have...

Meditation Reduces Loneliness, Stress, and Inflammation

submitted by: admin on 02/19/2015
  Many elderly people spend their last years alone as spouses pass and families scatter. Loneliness, however, takes more than a toll than just on emotions, it can have serious physical impact as well. We have known for some time that feeling lonely is linked to heart disease, Alzheimer's disease, depression and even on premature death. UCLA researchers...

Obesity Genes Influence Food Choices

submitted by: admin on 10/12/2013
An article published in the May of 2012 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that people with variation in certain obesity genes tend to eat more meals and snacks, consume more calories, and often choose high fat, sugary foods. It may be possible to minimize this genetic risk by changing one's eating patterns through conscious eating.              

Prostate Cancer and Lifestyle

submitted by: admin on 06/30/2016
  Lifestyle has been shown to be a powerful way to change cancer genes. Dean Ornish did studies that are discussed. Flax seed oil, vitamin D deficiency, and exposure to environmental toxins are also reviewed.                

Radiographic Iodinated Contrast Media Causes Thyroid Dysfunction

submitted by: admin on 10/14/2013
According to an article published in the January 2012 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, exposure to iodinated contrast media during imaging procedures is associated the changes in thyroid function, especially hyperthyroidism. Reactions to the dyes are increased in people with asthma, heart disease, kidney disease, and in those taking NSAIDs, beta blockers,...

Vitamin B3 Fights Superbugs

submitted by: admin on 10/17/2013
  A study in the August edition of the Journal of Clinical Investigation suggests that a form of vitamin B3, niacinamide, increased by 1000 times the ability of immune cells to kill MRSA. Niacin, or nicotinic acid, does not have this effect. Niacinamide in doses greater than 3 grams per day has the potential for serious liver disease, but does not have...

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